best way to own real estate in estate planning

What is the best way to own real estate?

Do you own real estate? Is it your home? A vacation home? Or rental property? It’s important to pay special attention to how you own your real estate. Here we take a look at the different types of real estate and information about the best form of ownership. This is important when you’re thinking about estate planning and asset protection.

Your Home

Because your primary residence (your homestead) receives special tax treatment, be very careful with how you own your home. In states like Florida, tenancy by the entirety offers married couples creditor protection. This protection is from the creditors of one of the spouses while still preserving relevant tax benefits. It also allows automatic transfer of ownership to the surviving spouse upon the death of the first spouse without court involvement. Transferring ownership of the primary residence to a joint revocable trust may also be an option if you live in a state that allows the tenancy of the entirety protection to transfer to the joint revocable trust. Ownership by the trust also means that the real estate will pass through the trust document instead of the probate process.

If you are single, owning the property in your name allows you to take advantage of tax benefits for primary residences. Transferring ownership to a revocable living trust may also allow you to retain the applicable tax benefits with the added benefit of avoiding the probate process. If you are worried about asset protection, certain types of irrevocable trusts can help. But those may require you to give up some control of the property.

The bankruptcy code may provide more protections for a primary residence (e.g., your state may have a homestead exemption). However, in some states, transferring your primary residence to a trust may eliminate the homestead exemption because the trust rather than you (the debtor) will be deemed to be the owner of the residence. If this situation could apply to you, it is important that you meet with a knowledgeable estate planning attorney before transferring your primary residence to a trust.

Vacation Home

For some families, their vacation home has not only high monetary value but also significant emotional value. Ownership of a vacation home by a trust or limited liability company (LLC) can be advantageous because it addresses two main priorities: ease of transfer to the next generation and asset protection.

With a trust or LLC, you are able to establish rules for how the property is to be used and maintained, as well as designate what is to happen to the vacation home once you pass away. This can be a great solution if you want to ensure that the vacation home stays in the family for generations with minimal family conflicts.

An additional benefit of having an LLC own your vacation home is that it provides limited liability from outside claims. If you get a judgment against your LLC, the creditor is limited to the accounts or property owned by the LLC to satisfy the creditor’s claims. Therefore, the judgment creditor cannot look to your personal accounts or property or those of the other members. Also, if a judgment is entered against you or another member for a claim unrelated to the LLC, it will be harder for a creditor to force a sale of the vacation home. This can be incredibly helpful if you wish to pass the vacation home on to the next generation without worrying about the individual financial situation of each new member.

Watch out for Single-Member LLC’s in Florida!

In some states, like Florida, a single-member LLC (an LLC in which you are the only member) does not enjoy the same protection from your personal creditors. The rationale of these laws is that your creditors should be able to seek relief through your LLC interests to satisfy their claims because there are no other members that will be negatively impacted by seizure of money and property owned by the LLC.

If the vacation home has been in the family for many years, it is important to consult with us and your tax advisor to make sure that transferring your vacation home to a trust or LLC will not cause an increase in your property taxes or other unintended consequences.

Rental Property

Because rental property is an income stream rather than a residence, asset protection is usually the primary concern. Rental property owners are at a higher risks for law suits. That is because the occupants can change over time. Transferring ownership of the rental property to an LLC is a great option. If a renter gets hurt on the property, sues the LLC and gets a judgment that exceeds any property insurance you have, the renter can seek satisfaction of any claims only from the accounts and property owned by the LLC, not from your personal accounts and property or those of any other owners of the LLC.

In addition, ownership by the LLC may protect the rental property from your personal creditors. However, if you are forming a single-member LLC, it is important to have us check state law to make sure creditor protection is available.

Call us today! (813) 902-3189

Regardless of what type of real estate you own, we are here to help you.  Call us to schedule an Estate Planning Session! Let’s discuss your current and future real estate ventures and the best way to protect them.

Want to learn more about us before scheduling your Estate Planning Session? Schedule a free 15-minute telephone consultation or send us a message. 

Your need more than a Will. You need an Estate Plan.

A Will alone is not an estate plan.

Where there is a Will, there is not always an estate plan. A Will is a good start, but you need more.

First, a Will allows you to do the following:

  1. Direct who inherits your property after your death
  2. Nominate an executor (personal representative) to administer your estate
  3. Nominate legal guardians for your minor children

Second, a Will does not complete your estate planning.

For example, a Will is limited to what happens upon your death. What if you get very sick or become incapacitated? A Will is not going to allow your family or other trusted people to help you manage your finances, legal matters or your health care.

At the very least, a proper estate plan should also include the following:

    1. A way for someone you trust to manage your finances and legal affairs if you can’t during your lifetime.

With a Durable Power of Attorney, you can name someone that you know and trust to manage your legal and financial affairs. Click here to watch a short video about a Durable Power of Attorney.

    2. A way for someone you trust to manage your health care if you become sick or incapacitated.

With health care directives, you can name someone that you know and trust to manage your health care. For example, if you become so sick or incapacitated that you can’t communicate your wishes, your Health Care Surrogate would step in to make decisions for you.
Click here to watch a short video about Health Care Directives.

    3. A review of your assets.

What types of assets, property or accounts do you own?

Do you understand how your assets are titled? Incorrect titling or improper ownership of assets causes huge headaches for families and estates. These are some examples of improper ownership that we have seen:

  1. Not listing your spouse as a joint owner with rights of survivorship;
  2. Owning business assets personally;
  3. Not funding your trust properly;
  4. Owning assets jointly with a beneficiary.

What does improper ownership mean? It is improper if the result goes against your estate planning goals or leaves you or your family with unintended consequences.

     4. A review of your estate’s liquidity.

Will your estate have costs, like income taxes and estate taxes? How will your heirs pay those costs? Factor in if your heirs will need cash or income after you pass away.  Consider reviewing your life insurance policies and retirement accounts.

     5.  A review of your beneficiary designations.

Beneficiary designations transfer retirement accounts and life insurance policies, overruling what a Will or a Trust says. First, it is important to make sure you coordinate your designations with your estate planning wishes. Second, get the right legal advice if you want your Will or Trust to interact with your retirement accounts and life insurance policies. Finally, make sure to update your beneficiary designations to keep up with as circumstances in your life or the law change.

     6.  A review of your digital assets.

We live in a digital world! If something happened to you, how would your loved ones access your digital assets? Digital assets range from, financial accounts, online photo storage, social media, to even cryptocurrency.

This is an example of an executive who didn’t plan for his cryptocurrency assets. It caused huge problems for his family and his company. He was the only person who had access to $180 million in cryptocurrency.

Check out our article, Will Your Estate Have a Password Problem?

As you can see, a Will alone is not an estate plan. You need more to protect yourself and your family.

Call (813) 902-3189 to schedule your free 15 minute phone consultation. Or click here to schedule it now.

 

What is the difference between a Living Will and a Living Trust?

What is the difference between a Living Will and a Living Trust?

A Living Will details the health care that you want if you end up on life support.

A living will, also called a health care directive, gives you the power to take control over what medical treatment you do or don’t want administered, in the event that you become unconscious or incapacitated.

To learn more about health care directives, watch this short video.

A Living Trust (also known as a revocable living trust) is created during an individual’s lifetime where a designated person, the trustee, is given responsibility for managing that individual’s assets for the benefit of the eventual beneficiary.

A trust is a legal document that you create during your lifetime. Just like a will, a  trust spells out your wishes with regard to your assets, your dependents, and your heirs. A trust can bypass the costly and time-consuming process of probate. This lets your successor trustee (who fills basically the same role as an executor of a will) to carry out your instructions as documented in your trust at your death. Your  successor trustee also steps in if you’re unable to manage your financial, healthcare, and legal affairs due to incapacity.

How do you know if you need a will or a trust? 

Call us at (813) 902-3189 for a free 15 minute consultation. Click here to schedule it.

will or trust estate planning health care directives power of attorney

Estate Planning Tips During COVID-19

When it comes to COVID-19, there is so much that feels beyond our control.  With estate planning (wills or trusts and more), there are things that you CAN control. Here is a list of things you can do (from an estate planning perspective) that may help you feel a little more in control:

#1 During this COVID-19 crisis, who are your emergency health care decision makers?  

Talk to your loved ones about your wishes regarding your medical care. First, who would you want to step up to advocate for you during a health care crisis? The two parts of Health Care Directives are the Designation of Health Care Surrogate and Living Will. With the Designation of Health Care Surrogate, you nominate someone you trust to make health care decisions for you in the event that you are unable to communicate those decisions yourself. With a Living Will, you can include directions regarding end of life decisions, as well as other decisions about your care and treatment.

#2 Look for your HIPAA Authorization.

Your Health Care Directives should also include a HIPAA Authorization.  HIPAA Authorization language follows the requirements Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to authorize your designated patient advocate to receive information about your health condition and status.  Without one in place, a hospital, medical office, or third-party medical provider may not be able to release medical records or other medical information to your designated patient advocate.

#3 Update or create a Durable Power of Attorney.

A Durable Power of Attorney for Finances lets you designate an Agent to access your assets and make financial decisions on your behalf. A Durable Power of Attorney’s scope can be as broad or as narrow you wish.  Some of the more common powers an Agent may need in emergency situations include handling financial transactions, dealing with bank accounts, transferring funds, paying bills, filing taxes, funding a trust, updating beneficiary designations, and addressing insurance claims.

Learn more about a power of attorney here.

#4 Review your Will or Trust

A Last Will & Testament and Revocable Living Trust Agreement address how you want your estate to be handled upon your passing. It is important to review your existing estate plan if your goals, family or financial situation has changed since you last had your estate plan prepared.  If you do not have a basic Will or Revocable Living Trust Agreement in place, now is a good time to begin the estate planning process. Because if you don’t do anything and you pass away, your family will be stuck with the state’s intestacy laws, which could result in distributions that are contrary to your wishes.

Learn more about Wills here.

Learn more about Trusts here.

How do you know if you need a Will or a Trust?

#5 Check your guardian designations for your minor children.

If you have minor children, you need to designate guardians. In Florida you can do this in your Will and in a separate document. Above all, if you don’t legally nominate guardians for your kids. Your family members could end up in court fighting over who gets to raise them (and control their inheritance).

#6 Check beneficiary designations and asset titling.

Life insurance, annuities and retirement plans pass according to their beneficiary designations, regardless of what your Will or Trust provides.  It is important to coordinate the beneficiary designations with the rest of your estate plan.  Make a list of your assets.  For example, do your accounts show a joint owner?  If you have a trust, does the account statement show the trust name?  Check the beneficiary designations for life insurance and retirement plans. If you need to update these, contact your financial advisor to get your beneficiary forms. If you’re not sure how your accounts fit in with your estate plan, contact your estate planning lawyer.

Avoid these common life insurance mistakes.

#7 Update your passwords list and digital information. This is part of your estate plan.

We live in a digital world!  First, create an inventory of your online accounts and digital files,. Second, note your login IDs and passwords. Remember to note the answers to any security questions and what type of two-factor authentication is in use.  Third, identify all of your devices. For example, make a list of your smartphones, tablets, smart speakers ( like Alexa), laptops, desktop computers. Also, note their passwords, along with the passwords for any important apps. Finally, inventory the other electronic records you use, own or control.

Here’s an article about password managers.

#8 What are your family financial needs?

The COVID-19 pandemic has hurt many families financially.  Therefore, you may want to make gifts or loans to family members.  The annual gift tax exclusion amount is currently $15,000 per person.  For loans to family, the IRS requires that you charge the Applicable Federal Rate (“AFR”). That rate is based on the length of the loan.  You should carefully document gifts and loans to avoid misunderstanding and confusion in the future.  Note that family gifts and loans may affect eligibility for Medicaid benefits.

#9  Remember that you’re not alone! Check in with the experts that you know for help.

There’s a ton of news about health care, finances, state and federal government orders.  Ask your professional advisors for help. We’re trained to sift through what’s important and applies to your situation. Finally, check in with your advisor team and ask for advice. We’re here to help.

revocable living trust avoid probate

How do you know if you need a Will or Trust?

Do you need a Will (Last Will and Testament) or Revocable Living Trust? How do you choose?

Are you interested in a will or revocable living trust? Wills and trusts are useful estate planning tools. They serve different purposes and can even work really well together. First, let’s go over key differences between wills and trusts.

Will characteristics:

  • A will goes into effect only after you die.
  • It only covers property that is in your name at your death.
  • A will passes through a court process called Probate. The Probate court oversees the will’s administration and ensures the will is valid and that the property gets distributed the way the deceased wanted.
  • Because a will passes through Probate, it’s a public record.
  • A will lets you name a guardian for your minor children.

There is a good chance that if you care about how beneficiaries use what you’re leaving them or want someone else to manage it, you’re going to need some type of trust.

The two main types of trusts are testamentary trusts and revocable living trusts. One type of trust is inside your will and the other type of trust is a stand-alone document, called a trust agreement.

Testamentary trust characteristics:

  • A testamentary trust is a trust that you create through your will. A will is only “activated” after you die and after your will goes through Probate. Therefore, a testamentary trust only goes into effect after your death.
  • For our clients with young children who are using a will instead of a revocable living trust, we recommend a testamentary trust inside the will.  That is because children can’t inherit directly while they are minors. And even if they’re not minors, it’s not a good idea to let an 18-year old inherit a lot of money at once!  With a testamentary trust, your trustee (the person you trust to manage money for your children) can provide for your children’s healthcare, education, maintenance and support while your children are minors.
  • You can include provisions in your trust to allow your beneficiaries to inherit at ages and stages, all at once, or for the funds to stay in the trust for that beneficiary’s care and support.
  • Funds that go inside the testamentary trust first have to go through the Probate court process before they wind up inside the trust.
  • The will (and the testamentary trust that’s inside it) is filed with the Probate court.

Revocable living trust characteristics:

  • A revocable living trust is a trust that you create during your lifetime. It is  “revocable” because during your lifetime, you can make changes to it or even revoke it.
  • You can use a trust to manage property during your lifetime, at your death or afterwards.
  • A trust covers only property that you transfer into it during your lifetime, or after your death (via beneficiary designations).
  • Property that passes through your trust avoids the Probate court process.
  • The revocable living trust stays private because it’s not filed with the Probate court.
  • You can include provisions in your trust to allow your beneficiaries to inherit at ages and stages, all at once, or for the funds to stay in the trust for that beneficiary’s care and support.

So if you have a revocable living trust, do you still need a Will?

Yes, you still need a will, a pour-over will. That is generally a very streamlined will that basically “pours” everything that needs to go through Probate to your revocable living trust. We also call this a “just-in-case” will, in case there is property you forget to transfer to your revocable living trust.

Also, if you have minor children, you can use your pour-over will to legally  nominate guardians for your children, in case you and their other parent dies when they are minors.

OK so do you need a will, will with testamentary trust provisions or a revocable living trust?

It depends on different factors and on your priorities such as:

  • Do you want to maintain privacy for your beneficiaries?
  • What is your budget for estate planning? (A revocable living trust costs more to set up than a will).
  • Do you want to avoid Probate?
  • Do you prefer everyone to stay out of Probate court as much as possible?

We can help you sort this out so that you can have peace of mind.

Call us at (813) 902-3189. Schedule a valuable Planning Session at no cost to you.

Learn more about wills, trusts and guardianships here.

You can also learn more about revocable living trusts here.

revocable-living-trust-funding

Why did Carrie Fisher’s Estate Plan fail?

Do you have a revocable living trust? Will your family have to go to court and lose their valuable privacy? Whether you own a little or a lot, you need to be careful with your revocable living trust.

Do you have a revocable living trust as part of your estate planning? A solid estate plan can mean the difference between an expensive time in court or a smooth transfer of property for your family. When a high-profile celebrity passes away, we can learn a lot about the value of careful planning. Let’s take a look at what trust funding is and why it’s important.

This failed estate plan is an excellent example of why you need properly transfer property to your revocable living trust.

In our opinion, Carrie Fisher’s plan failed, because it didn’t keep her assets out of court and they didn’t pass privately to her daughter. While Carrie Fisher had a revocable living trust, she didn’t transfer all of her assets to her trust.  That is why her Trustee had to file a petition in probate court seeking to have her assets transferred into her trust.

This actually happens a lot! We see clients all the time who come in with trusts from other lawyers. Unfortunately, many of those documents won’t work the way they were designed to. That’s because nobody took the time to inventory the assets or transfer them to the trust.

With a Trust, you can keep your family out of Court and keep your affairs private.

“Funding” is the the legal term for making sure you transfer your assets to your trust.

Because Fisher’s Trust was unfunded, all of her assets and who will receive them became public.  As a result, we know that Fisher left her estate to her daughter.  The estate included cash accounts, several LLCs, real estate, a life insurance policy, personal belongings, and intellectual property rights. Because this information is now public, that leaves Fisher’s daughter at risk.  Unscrupulous parties now have access to details they wouldn’t otherwise know.

This is exactly why a key part of our trust planning process is a thorough inventory of your assets. If you choose an estate plan that involves a revocable living trust, we guide you through the trust funding process. And we offer a review of your assets and planning documents at least every three years, if not annually.

Proper estate planning can keep your family out of court and save your family precious time and money. Call us to create a comprehensive estate plan or to review your existing plan.

We don’t just draft documents, we help folks make informed and empowered decisions about life and death, for themselves and their loved ones. To schedule a Planning Session, call us at (813) 902-3189.

Click here to learn more about trusts and wills.

Here is an article about the Court case. 

last will and testament - trust - beneficiaries

What should you know about naming beneficiaries?

Do you have a beneficiaries in your Last Will and Testament, Life Insurance and Retirement Accounts? Here are some important things you need to know.

Beneficiaries of a Last Will and Testament have to wait.

First, you use a Will (Last Will and Testament) to give assets to your beneficiaries, your beneficiaries don’t inherit automatically. Those beneficiaries will need to wait until the probate court process is over before they can inherit. In some cases, this can take many months or even years. If the estate is complex, the legal fees can deplete that inheritance.  If avoiding probate is a top priority, consider a Revocable Living Trust as part of your estate plan.

Go here to learn more about wills and trusts.
Go here to learn more about avoiding probate.

Your Last Will and Testament does not control your retirement plan and life insurance policy benefits. 

Second, assets in a life insurance policy or retirement plan pass to your beneficiaries directly, bypassing your Will (Last Will and Testament).  Your beneficiaries will receive these assets after completing a claim form.

Minor children should not inherit directly. Consider a trust.

Don’t name a minor child as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy or other assets. That is because minor children cannot inherit assets directly. Instead, the wise move is to create a trust to hold these assets for the benefit of a minor child. Name a trustee to oversee the management and distribution of the funds in a way that complies with your wishes.

Go here to learn more about trusts.

Be careful how you name retirement plan beneficiaries.

Unfortunately, most beneficiaries of a retirement plan take the cash immediately, which may not be your intention.  Don’t name your estate as a beneficiary.  That is because that may not allow your spouse or younger beneficiary to take advantage of an IRA rollover or some provisions that could allow your IRA to grow tax-deferred over many years.

If there are multiple beneficiaries, name them.

Finally, if there are multiple beneficiaries for an insurance policy or retirement plan. Don’t make name one person, assuming he/she will distribute to other beneficiaries.  Instead, designate a separate share for each beneficiary.  Does a beneficiary have special needs? If so, create a trust for their share so any inherited assets don’t disqualify them from important government benefits.

Call our office today at (813) 902-3189 to schedule a time for us to talk about an Estate Planning Session.
seniors-manage-finances-help

How can we help seniors manage their finances?

How can we help seniors manage their finances? With these tips, seniors can manage their finances better. And if they ever need help, they can shift their financial management to someone they can trust. 

1. Use direct deposit.

First, use direct deposit for income form pensions, annuities, and Social Security benefits. Not only will this save a trip to the bank, it also avoids the risk of a paper check being stolen, lost, or forgotten. 

2. Consolidate retirement accounts.

Consolidating retirement accounts into fewer accounts may make it easier to evaluate and manage savings, as well as to take any minimum distributions that are required.  Also, when moving money between retirement accounts, it’s a good idea to use a trustee-to-trustee transfer rather than moving the money yourself.

3. Consolidate financial accounts.

It can be a lot easier to manage your money when you have your money in fewer accounts at one bank. But make sure to consider the FDIC insurance limits on money held at one institution before consolidating. 

4. Pay bills automatically.

For recurring bills, have the biller automatically deduct payments from a credit card or bank account each month. 

5. Arrange for third-party notifications.

Arrange to have companies that provide critical services, such as electricity, send notices to you if they miss payments and the service is to be disconnected. Also,  ask the tax office to notify you if they miss tax payments and are in danger of losing their property. 

6. Get the proper legal documents in place.

Work with an estate planning attorney to get a power of attorney for finances in place. With this document, seniors can grant someone they trust the authority to manage their financial affairs if they reach a point of mental or physical inability to manage them on their own. 

Moreover, a revocable living trust is also a way to transfer control of finances. The successor trustee can manage trust assets when the senior is no longer able to manage them. 

Learn more about a Durable Power of Attorney here.

Learn more about Estate Planning here.

7. Find out whether your bank will honor the power of attorney.

Some banks may not honor a power of attorney unless it was created using forms provided by the bank or unless they run it by their legal department. Therefore, we suggest checking with the bank ahead of time. 

8. Prepare a financial overview.

An overview of their finances ready and waiting will make the process much easier. Consider making a list ahead of time that includes:

  • Information about their financial accounts, insurance policies, sources of income, regular bills and debts. 
  • The location of all of their estate planning documents, prior tax returns, birth and marriage certificates. 
  • The names and contact information of their financial and legal advisors. 

Store the financial overview in a secure place. Also, make sure  you can also access it if necessary. 

9. Get professional help. 

Hire a tax advisor to prepare tax returns and a financial advisor to manage investments.  Also consider hiring a daily money manager to handle financial tasks, such as paying bills, reviewing statements, and dispensing cash.  

Here are five things to know about aging and financial decline.

Call us at (813) 902-3189 to schedule a consultation.

freeze-credit-identity-theft-elder-abuse

How do you freeze your credit?

Are you a senior worried about identity theft? Or are you worried about a loved one with dementia becoming a victim of identity theft? Here are some tips on freezing someone’s credit. This is important if you’re trying to protect someone from elder abuse.

What does it mean to freeze credit?

A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report, making it harder for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name.

To place or lift a credit freeze, you must contact each credit bureau separately.

Once a credit freeze is in place, it secures your credit file until you lift the freeze. You can do that online, by phone, or by mail using the special PIN the companies give you when you do the credit freeze.  Once you place the credit freeze, it secures your credit file until you lift the freeze. You can unfreeze credit temporarily when you want to apply for new credit.

Does it cost anything to freeze credit?

No. Placing or lifting a credit freeze is free. Once a credit freeze is in place, it secures your credit file until you lift the freeze. You can unfreeze credit temporarily when you want to apply for new credit. Also, freezing your credit does not affect your credit score.

Should you freeze your credit?

If you’re not actively shopping for a credit card or loan, freezing your credit is wise. If you think someone compromised your data, consider a credit freeze. It’s especially important if someone stole your Social Security number. Identity theft among seniors is on the rise. So be vigilant about this issue.

Call us at (813) 902-3189 to schedule your consultation! We are happy to help you or your family.

Schedule your free 15 minute consultation.

how-much-does-an-estate-plan-cost

How much does an estate plan cost?

There is a lot more than just price that goes into choosing legal documents or the lawyer that will help you.

When you’re comparing our fees to your other options, I encourage you to really understand what you are actually getting for that price. If you use an online form, you might actually cause your family a lot of headache and heartache down the road. So you want to find a lawyer that can draft you excellent legal documents in accordance with the state laws that captures everything that you want to see about how your assets go to your loved ones under what circumstances, who’s in charge.

In my office, we create relationships with my clients instead of just a transaction.

That is because your estate planning should stay up to date with your life and with the law as it changes. So that your documents, so that when it matters most, your documents work. In my office, we analyze our client’s situation and goals and what we need to do to get them there.

We charge a flat fee agreed to in advance. That way there are no surprises. We offer “a la carte” options and packages.

Many times we find that it works best for our clients to offer them packages for their estate planning so that they are covered not just after their death but during their lifetime as well. So when it comes to which estate plan package might be right for you, we help you figure out what’s right for you during our first meeting. On average, our will plan starts at $2,000 and our trust plan start at $4,000. Those prices are not for just one document. It’s a series of documents and strategy that is customized to your specific situation. We design our plans to make things as easy as possible for yourself and your family in the event that you become incapacitated or die.

What if you’re thinking? Oh I just need something simple. I just need one document. OK, maybe you do. We won’t really know what you really need until we meet in person and review your specific situation.

Sit down with me for a Planning Session. It’s a no obligation Planning Session. That way you can go over your situation and what options work best for you so that you can be on tract to make things as easy as possible for yourself and your family in the event that you become incapacitated or die.

Call us at (813) 902-3189 to schedule your Planning Session.

Check out our video about how much an Estate Plan costs.