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revocable living trust avoid probate

How do you know if you need a Will or Trust?

Do you need a Will (Last Will and Testament) or Revocable Living Trust? How do you choose?

Are you interested in a will or revocable living trust? Wills and trusts are useful estate planning tools. They serve different purposes and can even work really well together. First, let’s go over key differences between wills and trusts.

Will characteristics:

  • A will goes into effect only after you die.
  • It only covers property that is in your name at your death.
  • A will passes through a court process called Probate. The Probate court oversees the will’s administration and ensures the will is valid and that the property gets distributed the way the deceased wanted.
  • Because a will passes through Probate, it’s a public record.
  • A will lets you name a guardian for your minor children.

There is a good chance that if you care about how beneficiaries use what you’re leaving them or want someone else to manage it, you’re going to need some type of trust.

The two main types of trusts are testamentary trusts and revocable living trusts. One type of trust is inside your will and the other type of trust is a stand-alone document, called a trust agreement.

Testamentary trust characteristics:

  • A testamentary trust is a trust that you create through your will. A will is only “activated” after you die and after your will goes through Probate. Therefore, a testamentary trust only goes into effect after your death.
  • For our clients with young children who are using a will instead of a revocable living trust, we recommend a testamentary trust inside the will.  That is because children can’t inherit directly while they are minors. And even if they’re not minors, it’s not a good idea to let an 18-year old inherit a lot of money at once!  With a testamentary trust, your trustee (the person you trust to manage money for your children) can provide for your children’s healthcare, education, maintenance and support while your children are minors.
  • You can include provisions in your trust to allow your beneficiaries to inherit at ages and stages, all at once, or for the funds to stay in the trust for that beneficiary’s care and support.
  • Funds that go inside the testamentary trust first have to go through the Probate court process before they wind up inside the trust.
  • The will (and the testamentary trust that’s inside it) is filed with the Probate court.

Revocable living trust characteristics:

  • A revocable living trust is a trust that you create during your lifetime. It is  “revocable” because during your lifetime, you can make changes to it or even revoke it.
  • You can use a trust to manage property during your lifetime, at your death or afterwards.
  • A trust covers only property that you transfer into it during your lifetime, or after your death (via beneficiary designations).
  • Property that passes through your trust avoids the Probate court process.
  • The revocable living trust stays private because it’s not filed with the Probate court.
  • You can include provisions in your trust to allow your beneficiaries to inherit at ages and stages, all at once, or for the funds to stay in the trust for that beneficiary’s care and support.

So if you have a revocable living trust, do you still need a Will?

Yes, you still need a will, a pour-over will. That is generally a very streamlined will that basically “pours” everything that needs to go through Probate to your revocable living trust. We also call this a “just-in-case” will, in case there is property you forget to transfer to your revocable living trust.

Also, if you have minor children, you can use your pour-over will to legally  nominate guardians for your children, in case you and their other parent dies when they are minors.

OK so do you need a will, will with testamentary trust provisions or a revocable living trust?

It depends on different factors and on your priorities such as:

  • Do you want to maintain privacy for your beneficiaries?
  • What is your budget for estate planning? (A revocable living trust costs more to set up than a will).
  • Do you want to avoid Probate?
  • Do you prefer everyone to stay out of Probate court as much as possible?

We can help you sort this out so that you can have peace of mind.

Call us at (813) 902-3189. Schedule a valuable Planning Session at no cost to you.

Learn more about wills, trusts and guardianships here.

You can also learn more about revocable living trusts here.

last will and testament - trust - beneficiaries

What should you know about naming beneficiaries?

Do you have a beneficiaries in your Last Will and Testament, Life Insurance and Retirement Accounts? Here are some important things you need to know.

Beneficiaries of a Last Will and Testament have to wait.

First, you use a Will (Last Will and Testament) to give assets to your beneficiaries, your beneficiaries don’t inherit automatically. Those beneficiaries will need to wait until the probate court process is over before they can inherit. In some cases, this can take many months or even years. If the estate is complex, the legal fees can deplete that inheritance.  If avoiding probate is a top priority, consider a Revocable Living Trust as part of your estate plan.

Go here to learn more about wills and trusts.
Go here to learn more about avoiding probate.

Your Last Will and Testament does not control your retirement plan and life insurance policy benefits. 

Second, assets in a life insurance policy or retirement plan pass to your beneficiaries directly, bypassing your Will (Last Will and Testament).  Your beneficiaries will receive these assets after completing a claim form.

Minor children should not inherit directly. Consider a trust.

Don’t name a minor child as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy or other assets. That is because minor children cannot inherit assets directly. Instead, the wise move is to create a trust to hold these assets for the benefit of a minor child. Name a trustee to oversee the management and distribution of the funds in a way that complies with your wishes.

Go here to learn more about trusts.

Be careful how you name retirement plan beneficiaries.

Unfortunately, most beneficiaries of a retirement plan take the cash immediately, which may not be your intention.  Don’t name your estate as a beneficiary.  That is because that may not allow your spouse or younger beneficiary to take advantage of an IRA rollover or some provisions that could allow your IRA to grow tax-deferred over many years.

If there are multiple beneficiaries, name them.

Finally, if there are multiple beneficiaries for an insurance policy or retirement plan. Don’t make name one person, assuming he/she will distribute to other beneficiaries.  Instead, designate a separate share for each beneficiary.  Does a beneficiary have special needs? If so, create a trust for their share so any inherited assets don’t disqualify them from important government benefits.

Call our office today at (813) 902-3189 to schedule a time for us to talk about an Estate Planning Session.

When a Will Isn’t Enough to Avoid Conflict: Remember Your Personal Property

“When the parents are gone, there’s all kinds of unforeseen stuff they leave us with, stuff they never intended.” – Ira Glass, in This American Life, Episode 763: “Left Behind”

If you grew up with siblings, you probably remember some sibling rivalry. That rivalry can continue well into adulthood, especially after the parents are gone. In many families, parents are like the glue that keeps the family together. Once their gone, old issues can resurface, especially when it comes to dividing the parents’ personal property.  That’s why it’s important to have a plan for how you want your personal, sentimental property distributed to the people that you love. If you don’t, that can make an already tough situation so much worse.

This American Life, a popular podcast, recently featured a family with such a story. Eleven adult siblings needed to divide their dead parents’ stuff. But they didn’t all get along. Although their parents (who were both attorneys) had wills, they didn’t list in their will which child would get which items. They left all that to the kids, saying simply, everyone should get an equal amount. So the siblings invented a remarkably elaborate cheat-proof system to divide up the remains of their childhood. In the end, it was a system that played off the siblings’ natural suspicions towards each other and did nothing to bring them closer together after losing their parents.

Here’s a quote from the narrator:

“What they have left to them is just these things, right? And this mandate– to get along well enough one last time to split it up amongst themselves. And they don’t want to screw it up. They want to honor their parents’ last request. But they know it’s going to be tough for them, given how they are sometimes with each other.”

This is an example of incomplete planning that can lead to conflict after you’re gone. If the parents in this story had left a personal property memorandum that referred back to their Wills, that could have reduced the strain on their children, especially the estate’s executor. It would have also saved a lot of time and conflict….and their relationships with each other.

You can listen to this story (16 minute run time) here.

Or you can read the transcript here. 

 

This article is a service of the Law Firm of Myrna Serrano Setty, P.A. We don’t just draft documents, we help you make informed and empowered decisions about life and death, for yourself and the people you love. That’s why we offer a Planning Session, during which you will get more financially organized than you’ve ever been before, and make all the best choices for the people you love. Call our office today to schedule a Planning Session. Mention this article to learn how to get this $500 session at no charge. 

Call us at (813) 902-3189.

Check out another blog post about embracing the emotional side of estate planning. Here